$60 Colorado Gold Straight Bourbon Whiskey Colorado Gold Distillery

Aroma of of earthy minerals, along with notes of roasted corn, apple pie and honey. Notes of maple syrup, honey and nutty dough are balanced by touches of cinnamon and woody spice. Smooth, slightly sweet finish. "As with most micro-distilleries, it started with a dream," says Peter Caciola, the owner of Colorado Gold Distillery. Situated along the southern slopes of the Grand Mesa in Cedaredge, Colorado (est. population 2,151), Caciola's distillery is the product of years of late nights and intense labor by Caciola himself, and his wife, Tammy. "We first talked about distilling our own spirits a good number of years ago,"Caciola continues. "After we made our dream a reality, we started discussing the idea of producing a great bourbon. Bourbon is the most American of all the spirits, and we're in the heart of the country, so we thought it would be the perfect thing to make." Colorado Gold Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made using a mash of four locally-sourced grains: corn, rye, wheat and malted barley. Cedaredge's unique geography and climate — the quaint city is situated 11,000 feet above sea level and enjoys mild, snowy winters and hot, dry summers — creates flavorful, plump grains that are perfect for distillation. "Corn is the main ingredient in our bourbon," says Michael Almy, a Colorado native and the master distiller at Colorado Gold. "The wheat and malted barley give the bourbon a smoother, more sophisticated taste and the rye adds a touch of spice." Once the grains have been harvested, they are mashed and fermented for five days with a unique strain of American whiskey yeast. Following fermentation, the bourbon is distilled twice through an 80-gallon, copper still heated by steam. Once the bourbon has been distilled, it is filtered for four hours before being poured into new, 53-gallon American oak casks that have been charred (the casks have a #3 char). The bourbon is allowed to rest for a minimum of three years in the casks, which impart spicy notes of cinnamon and oaky spice to the bourbon, and mellow its notes of maple syrup, honey and roasted nuts. Following its beauty rest, the bourbon is brought to proof with pure spring water that has been filtered by a billion year old basalt stone. Then, each bottle is filled from a single barrel and labeled by hand. Colorado Gold Straight Bourbon Whiskey earned the title "Best in Class"at the American Distilling Institute Competition in 2012, and the Gold Medal at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition in 2013.

1792 Single Barrel Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey Barton Distillery

In 1876, John D. Willett — one of Kentucky's original bourbon aristocrats — transferred his interest in the Willett & Frenke Distillery to his son-in-laws, Benjamin Mattingly and Thomas Moore. Mattingly and Moore continued to operate the Willett & Frenke Distillery together until 1881, when Mattingly finally sold his stake in the company to a group of investors. Within a few years, Thomas Moore acquired complete control over the distillery and eponymously renamed it. Moore would continue to operate the distillery for another five decades, until he was ultimately forced to close his doors at the onset of Prohibition. Today, the Barton 1792 Distillery operates on the same site as the historic Tom Moore Distillery, and continues to use the same methods that Moore used over a century ago when distilling his own bourbon. 1792 Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of 75% corn, 15% rye and 10% barley. While the use of corn in the bourbon's recipe adds classic notes of butterscotch and roasted nuts, the heavy use of rye in the bourbon's mashbill yields a more complex and full-bodied whiskey. After the grains are harvested, they are mashed and fermented before being distilled through a copper-pot still. After distillation, the bourbon is aged in new, American oak casks in Warehouse Z on the distillery's estate in Bardstown, Kentucky. Warehouse Z is situated on the edge of a bluff and as a result, enjoys the intense heat and humidity that are ideal for maturing whiskey. “In order to create this unique bourbon,” says Ken Pierce, Barton 1792’s master distiller, “the finest barrels are selected and tasted from the best aging warehouses. Only those barrels deemed ‘exceptional’ are then bottled individually, one by one. This preserves the distinct character of each barrel.” Once the bourbon has matured for a minimum of eight years, it is brought to proof with water drawn from the Tom Moore spring. The iron-free, Kentucky limestone water — the same water used by Moore over a century ago when crafting his own whiskey — adds a subtle touch of complexity and depth to the bourbon. Like the standard issue 1792, the single barrel’s nose is carried by sweet butterscotch notes, though a bit fruitier overall, with hints of ginger and Fuji apple. The palate is caramel-forward, with just a nip due to the rye, leading to a sweet finish tempered with warm bitter cloves. Previous limited edition releases from 1792 sold well and became scarce quite quickly, and we expect the same from this award-winning distillery’s new single barrel release.

$40 1792 Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey Barton

In 1876, John D. Willett — one of Kentucky's original bourbon aristocrats — transferred his interest in the Willett & Frenke Distillery to his son-in-laws, Benjamin Mattingly and Thomas Moore. Mattingly and Moore continued to operate the Willett & Frenke Distillery together until 1881, when Mattingly finally sold his stake in the company to a group of investors. Within a few years, Thomas Moore acquired complete control over the distillery and eponymously renamed it. Moore would continue to operate the distillery for another five decades, until he was ultimately forced to close his doors at the onset of Prohibition. Today, the Barton 1792 Distillery operates on the same site as the historic Tom Moore Distillery, and continues to use the same methods that Moore used over a century ago when distilling his own bourbon. 1792 Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of corn, rye and malted barley. While the use of corn in the bourbon's recipe adds classic notes of buttered bread, biscuits and roasted nuts, the heavy use of rye in the bourbon's mashbill yields a more complex and full-bodied whiskey. After the grains are harvested, they are mashed and fermented before being distilled through a copper-pot still. After distillation, the bourbon is aged in new, American oak casks for a minimum of eight years in Warehouse Z on the distillery's estate in Bardstown, Kentucky. Warehouse Z is situated on the edge of a bluff and as a result, enjoys the intense heat and humidity that are ideal for maturing whiskey. "When it comes to barrel aging," says Ken Pierce, Barton 1792's master distiller, "it's just like real estate — location, location, location. That's why 1792 ages in Warehouse Z up there on the bluff." In addition, during the maturation process, Pierce samples each cask of bourbon as it rests to determine when the bourbon has reached its peak of maturity. "Quality in, quality out," says Pierce, who has over two decades of experience at the distillery. Once the bourbon has matured for a minimum of eight years, it is brought to proof with water drawn from the Tom Moore spring. The iron-free, Kentucky limestone water — the same water used by Moore over a century ago when crafting his own whiskey — adds a subtle touch of complexity and depth to the bourbon. 1792 Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, which was named after the year that Kentucky achieved statehood in the United States, earned the Double Gold Medal at the San Francisco Wine and Spirits Competition in 2011 and earned a score of 95 points — the same as Pappy Van Winkle's 23 Year Old Bourbon — at the Ultimate Spirits Challenge in 2012. "Hope you enjoy the taste as much as I do," says Pierce.

$55 Angel’s Envy Kentucky Straight Bourbon ANGEL’S ENVY

Notes of sweet caramel, raisins and toffee that fade into notes of cinnamon and a touch of vanilla. The long finish has hints of dark chocolate and caramelized fruit, with just a touch of cherry. Click here to learn more

$225 Angel’s Envy Cask Strength Bourbon

Notes of vanilla and milk chocolate that complement touches of red fruits, light oak and berries. Finish is lush and full, with hints of raisins, dates and smoke. Click here to learn more

$55 Backbone Bourbon Uncut

Referred to by some as the “backbone” of the United States, the Midwest often conjures images of highly-skilled, industrious people whose hard work in fields and factories contributes immensely to the prosperity of our nation. For many such Americans, a glass of bourbon has long been the reward for a tough day spent working in those fields and factories, and Backbone Bourbon Company was established to create big, bold flavors deserving of our attention at the end of a long day. Backbone bourbon is from a mash of 70% corn, 25% rye, and finished with malted barley in Lawrenceburg, IN. It is aged just under four years and bottled straight from the barrel, uncut at full barrel strength. “It’s high proof because life isn’t watered down and nor should your bourbon” (producer). Bottled in Bardstown Kentucky, each batch has a slightly nuanced flavor profile. The barrels are left unblended to retain the true “backbone” of the bourbon, so the barrel strength varies per batch, ranging from 114-1 17 proof. Each batch is also a limited edition release. This pure unadulterated bourbon has an incredibly flavorful and rounded profile with earthy tones, notes of citrus, as well the more traditional bourbon notes of vanilla, and baked goods. This bourbon also has a bit of a bite to it, but despite the high-octane proof, the finish is. “Discover a true uncut bourbon whiskey, straight from the barrel, crafted to be sipped & savored straight or on a big block of ice. Each batch is a limited edition release that delivers an incredible flavor profile...

Baker’s 7 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Aroma of honeyed fruit, creamy vanilla and caramel. Notes of roasted nuts, candied fruits, vanilla, toffee and milk chocolate. Finish is rich and lasting, with sweet and spicy flavors mingling with each other.

$55 Basil Hayden’s Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Following the end of the American Revolutionary War, Johannes Reginald Beam emigrated from Germany to the United States, and eventually settled in Kentucky County. At the time, Kentucky County was still considered part of Virginia, and was overseen by a military governor named John J. Bowman. After settling in Kentucky, Beam began harvesting corn and set forth a family tradition by distilling the excess grains he harvested into whiskey. Since then, seven generations of the Beam family have been involved in whiskey production for the eponymous company (the company is actually named after James Beam, who rescued it following Prohibition). Part of Booker Noe’s Small Batch Bourbon Collection, Basil Hayden’s Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is named after Basil Hayden Sr., a Maryland Catholic who led twenty-five other Catholic families from Maryland to Nelson County, Kentucky (near Bardstown, home of the Jim Beam) in the late 1700s. In addition to being a religious man — Hayden established the first Catholic church in what is now the Commonwealth of Kentucky — Hayden was also a distiller, and a pioneering one at that. While most bourbon at the time was made from a traditional corn base, in 1796 Hayden defied convention by mixing small grains into his mash, believing that the spicy rye flavors would provide a striking complement to the corn’s sweetness. Much to the chagrin of the traditionalist set, Hayden proved to be right. Basil Hayden’s Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash very similar to the recipe Hayden himself developed in 1796. The whisky has a golden amber color and a spicy aroma of breakfast tea and peppermint bark. On the palate, the rye grains are evident, as are the cracked pepper and honey notes. The finish is clean and dry, leaving a pleasant aftertaste of cinnamon and baking spices.

$40 Beer Barrel Bourbon

Inspired by the double-barreling process used at some of Scotland's most revered distilleries, Brett VanderKamp — New Holland Brewery and Artisanal Spirits's master distiller — decided to start aging whiskey in used beer barrels. Scotch, which is traditionally aged in ex-bourbon casks, is often double-barreled, or finished, in sherry casks. "The notes of sherry add another layer of complexity, color and richness to the Scotch," explains VanderKamp. "I thought we could do the same thing for whiskey." While many craft brewers will attest that aging beer in whiskey barrels adds flavor and complexity to the beer, Beer Barrel Bourbon goes to show that the reverse is also true: aging whiskey in beer barrels results in a more complex and unique whiskey. After crafting Beer Barrel Bourbon at his distillery, VanderKamp ages it for several years in new, charred American oak casks. After the bourbon has matured, it is double-barreled, or finished, in casks that were formerly used to mature Dragon's Milk Ale. Dragon's Milk Ale is a high-gravity beer, meaning it initially has more sugar and density before fermentation than ordinary beers. The name itself can be traced back to the 17th century, when beer reserved exclusively for royalty was referred to simply as "Dragon's Milk." The crown jewel of New Holland Brewery's portfolio, the ale is matured for 90 days in oak casks that are then used to mature Beer Barrel Bourbon. The beer barrels add notes of roasty malt, along with deep vanilla undertones to the bourbon, and complement its subtle undertones of toffee and caramel. "The craft beer movement has sparked a real curiosity in average beer drinkers, who say to themselves that they don't need to drink the same product anymore," says VanderKamp. "We want to do the same thing with whiskey drinkers."

$100 Belle Meade 9 Year Old Sherry Cask Finished Bourbon

Charles Nelson was born on July 4, 1835 in a small town in the Mecklenburg-Schwerin state of northern Germany. In 1850, his father decided to move the family, which included five other siblings, to the United States for a chance at a better life. During the journey across the Atlantic, John Nelson passed away and Charles — just 15 years old at the time — found himself the breadwinner of the family. After working at several odd jobs throughout the Northeast, Nelson settled in Nashville and opened a grocery store built on the foundation of his three best-selling products: coffee, meat and whiskey. Demand for Nelson's whiskey soared during Reconstruction such that he shuttered his grocery store and opened up his own distillery. The distillery, commonly known as “Old Number Five” due to the fact that it was given Distillery License #5, became one of the largest in the United States, and was the first to produce Belle Meade Straight Bourbon Whiskey. Old Number Five was eventually forced to close its doors during Prohibition, but today, Charlie and Andy Nelson — Charles Nelson's great-great-great grandsons — have taken up the family business once more. Belle Meade Bourbon is made from a mashbill of 64% corn, 30% rye, and 6% malted barley. Once the grains are milled and mashed, they are fermented with two unique strains of yeast. “I think the two yeast strains really work well together to create that balanced flavor,” says Andy, “not going too heavy or too light on any single characteristic.” Following fermentation, the bourbon is distilled and matured in new, American oak casks. Belle Meade 9 Year Old Sherry Cask Finished Bourbon is hand-picked by Charlie and Andy from their distillery’s reserve stock, and is aged at least nine years before being finished in Oloroso Sherry casks (imported from Spain) until the perfect flavor is reached. As a result, the bourbon has an aroma of sherry wine, oak staves and tulips, which leads to a full-bodied palate lush with caramel, cracked corn, raisins and dried figs. The finish is smooth and creamy, with notes plum, vanilla bean and molasses. Each bottle of Belle Meade Bourbon is adorned with a vintage label that includes the portrait of two horses whose origins can be traced back to the original Belle Meade Plantation in Nashville. The horse on the right, known as Bonnie Scotland, was one of Belle Meade's leading sires and was an ancestor to Man O' War, Seabiscuit and Secretariat. The horse on the left, who was known as Brown Dick, was the descendent of a horse simply named Whiskey. “He's the reason we removed their names from the label,” says Andy, pointing to the horse on the left. Belle Meade 9 Year Old Sherry Cask Finished Bourbon won the Double Gold Medal at the 2015 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

$50 Belle Meade Sour Mash Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Aroma of maple syrup, caramel and citrus zest that opens up to notes of creamy vanilla, oak, peaches and spicy rye. The finish, while is smooth and mellow, has hints of dark fruits, including cherries and plums, that are accented by a touch of cinnamon and rye.

$70 Berkshire Mountain Distillers Smoke and Peat Bourbon Whiskey

Smoke and peat on the nose with aromas of spice, vanilla, chocolate and oak. Classic bourbon notes fade to lovely, lingering and layered flavors of smoke and peat, with just a tad of iodine on the palate. Berkshire Mountain Distillers

$55 Bib & Tucker 6 Year Old Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey

In the antebellum United States, the term "bib & tucker" was used to describe the finest attire a man owned — the kind of suit or tuxedo that he would wear to a wedding or special event. "Along those lines, we're putting forth our bib & tucker," says Harv Gates, the brand ambassador of 35 Maple Street Spirits. "Bib & Tucker is a handcrafted bourbon made with a sense of dedication that can only come when you know you're making something truly special." Bib & Tucker Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey is crafted from a mash of 70% corn, 26% rye and 4% malted barley. The grains, which were harvested in late 2006 and early 2007, were distilled twice — first through a column still and then through an old fashioned copper pot still. Following distillation, the bourbon was matured in No. 1 charred American white oak barrels for a minimum of six years (the average age of the bourbon is actually 7.5 years, however). As a result, Bib & Tucker has an aroma of vanilla, freshly mowed grass and leather-bound books. Notes of sweet fruit, vanilla beans, caramel and dried apricots dominate the palate, and are complemented by a subtle touch of ginger spice. The finish is complex and lingers, with hints of chestnuts and roasted corn. The bourbon earned a score of 96 points from Tasting Panel Magazine.

$50 Black Dirt Bourbon

"I went to Cornell as a fruit science major because I was really into apples growing up," says Jason Grizzanti, the master distiller at Black Dirt Distillery. As a child, Grizzanti's family owned and operated a small winery in upstate New York and he became enamored with fruits. After he graduated college, Grizzanti — at the age of 23 — applied for a $50,000 grant to start New York State's first fruit micro-distillery. The state obliged and Grizzanti was soon producing a thousand gallons of eau-de-vie annually. When the state of New York amended its laws to accommodate craft distilleries, Grizzanti jumped at the opportunity. Black Dirt Distillery takes its name from the dark, fertile soil left by an ancient glacial lake that once covered thousands of acres of upstate New York. Prior to the 19th century, farmers generally avoided the land because the soil — although rich in nutrients — was poorly drained and often flooded. After a drainage canal was built in 1835, farmers began harvesting highly-prized Black Dirt onions on the land. Perfectly suited for growing fresh, sweet corn, Black Dirt has never been used for bourbon production until now. Black Dirt Bourbon is made from a mash of 80% Black Dirt corn, 12% malted barley and 8% rye. After fermenting the mash for approximately three to four days, Grizzanti distills the wash through his Christian Carl copper-pot still imported from Germany. After distillation, the bourbon is aged for a minimum of three years in new, American oak barrels with a #3 char before being labeled and bottled by hand. Black Dirt Bourbon has a dark amber hue, along with notes of dark chocolate, coffee, cinnamon and vanilla. In addition, notes of roasted corn, caramel and honey are well-balanced by a touch of spicy cloves.

$55 Blade & Bow Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Originally opened on Derby Day in 1935, the fabled Stitzel-Weller Distillery — one of the true “cathedrals” of the bourbon industry — ceased production in 1992, and just recently reopened to the public in 2014. Although no whiskey was distilled at Stitzel-Weller for over 20 years, other distilleries sent their whiskeys to age at there; located just five miles from downtown Louisville, KY, Stitzel-Weller is known to have extremely favorable conditions for aging. Throughout the Stitzel-Weller Distillery, the “five keys” symbol appears frequently — each key represents a step in the whiskey-making process: grains, yeast, fermentation, distillation and aging. Blade and Bow Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, one of the first releases in over two decades to utilize actual whiskey distilled at the Stitzel-Weller Distillery, is named after the blade shaft and ornate bow handle that together comprise the two parts of Stitzel-Weller’s iconic skeleton keys. Blade and Bow Kentucky Straight Bourbon is crafted using a solera-aging, a process typically reserved for aging cognacs, ports and sherries. This is done to preserve the precious original stock of Stitzel-Weller, which is mingled with other fine whiskies during the solera process, during which a series of casks are filled at different intervals over a long period of time (in fact, Blade and Bow Kentucky Straight Bourbon contains the oldest remaining stock of whiskey distilled at Stitzel-Weller, and will be the last available liquid for sale that was distilled at the original distillery). As whiskey from the oldest cask is emptied and bottled, the cask is refilled with an equivalent amount of whiskey from the second-oldest cask in the solera. This cascading effect continues until the youngest cask in the solera is filled with new whiskey. As a result, no cask in the solera is ever fully emptied. In addition, as the younger whiskey ages and cascades through the solera, its average age and complexity gradually increase over time. Blade and Bow Kentucky Straight Bourbon has a restrained nose with hints of citrus, mint, oak and green apple. The palate is slightly fuller, with touches of apricots, figs and pears mixed with cereal grains, and leads to an easy finish with caramel, burnt oak and cinnamon spice. Blade and Bow Kentucky Straight Bourbon is the final chance to try the last remaining whiskey distilled at the original Stitzel-Weller Distillery.

$65 Booker’s Annis’ Answer Batch Small Batch Cask Strength Bourbon Whiskey

Distinct aroma of vanilla, leading to a slightly smoky palate of caramel, nuts, and oak. The long and full finish warms the throat with notes of cinnamon, while remaining subtle enough for easy sipping. Following the end of the American Revolutionary War, Johannes Reginald Beam emigrated from Germany to the United States, and eventually settled in Kentucky County. At the time, Kentucky County was still considered part of Virginia, and was overseen by a military governor named John J. Bowman. After settling in Kentucky, Beam began harvesting corn and set forth a family tradition by distilling the excess grains he harvested into whiskey. Since then, seven generations of the Beam family have been involved in whiskey production for the eponymous company (the company is actually named after James Beam, who rescued it following Prohibition). The Booker’s brand of bourbon is named in honor of Booker Noe, the grandson of Jim Beam. Made from a mash of primarily corn, the bourbon was initially bottled by Noe to be used as gifts for close friends and family. Today, the bourbon is matured in virgin American oak casks that are situated in the center of a Kentucky rickhouse, where the temperature and humidity are the most favorable for maturing whiskey. Booker’s “Annis’ Answer” Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is named in honor of Booker Noe’s wife, who he first met while in the dentist’s office where she was working as a hygienist. The distillery has released this blend in accordance with what would be Booker and Annis Noe’s 60th anniversary. According to Fred Noe, Booker’s son, this batch is a blend of barrels from four different dates stored in five different casks, ranging from six years and two months to seven years and one month old. Booker’s “Annis’ Answer” Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey has a distinct aroma of vanilla, leading to a slightly smoky palate of caramel, nuts, and oak. The long and full finish warms the throat with notes of cinnamon, while remaining subtle enough for easy sipping. Booker's earned the Double Gold Medal at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition in 2006, 2007 and 2009, and earned a score of 90-95 points from Wine Enthusiast. "This is bourbon the way it used to be. The way it was meant to be," says Booker.

Berkshire Mountain Distillers Bourbon Whiskey

Handcrafted in small batches, Berkshire Bourbon is made from a mash of 72% corn, 18% rye and 10% malted barley. The corn is sourced from within two miles of Weld's distillery, and the rye and malted barley also come from New England. Following fermentation, Berkshire Bourbon is triple-distilled in a traditional pot still before being aged in virgin American white oak casks and brought to proof using Welds' legendary spring water.

$65 Breckenridge Port Cask Finish Bourbon Whiskey

Aromas and flavors of sultana raisin and maple syrup to round out and soften the natural spicy finish.

$65 Bootlegger 21 New York Bourbon Whiskey

Named in honor of the amendment that repealed Prohibition, Bootlegger 21 New York Bourbon is a “testament to the youthful and rebellious spirit that reigned during the Roaring Twenties,” says Brian Facquet, Prohibition Distillery’s owner and master distiller. The bourbon is crafted exclusively from New York corn, which is milled, mashed and fermented before being distilled through Facquet’s 300-gallon copper pot still. Following distillation, Bootlegger Bourbon is matured in 5-gallon, charred American oak barrels for just over one year. Then, the bourbon is brought to proof and bottled by hand. ”We do not filter our bourbon,” says Facquet, “and we bottle at 92 proof. This gives our bourbon spicy notes of cinnamon and redhot candies, which are complemented by touches of smooth vanilla and cocoa.” Spicy aroma, with touches of baking spices, coffee and Christmas cake. Notes of cinnamon and redhot candies, smooth vanilla and cocoa on the palate.

$55 Breckenridge Reserve Blend Whiskey

Situated in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, Breckenridge Distillery makes one of the best bourbons in the world. The distillery, which is only 4,000 square feet itself, is situated 9,600 feet above sea level, making it the highest distillery in the world. There, Jordan Via — Breckenridge's master distiller — ferments a mash of 56% corn, 38% rye and 6% malted barley in an open-top Scottish fermenter before distilling it twice through a $140,000, 550-gallon, Vendome copper-pot still originally made in Kentucky. With a profound range of expressions ranging from award winning bourbons and Port cask finished whiskeys to Chili flavored vodkas, and over two dozen awards, including 2 “Distillery of the Year” awards, Breckenridge is without saying a well-established player in the game. This is very impressive considering Bryan Nolt founded Breckenridge in 2007. Breckenridge Reserve Blend is a release from the reserve blend program, created to showcase qualities of their bourbons that even the most “discerning connoisseurs can appreciate.” The spirit consists of four distinct blends, giving great insight into the beauty of the bourbon while it ages, and the affects of charring that are subsequently expressed. “Still soft and luscious, these blends capture a different take on the way bourbon can grow up and present itself at maturity.”

$65 Breckenridge PX Sherry Cask Finish Bourbon Whiskey

Well-rounded aromas of fig compote, almond butter, and black licorice lead to rich, full-bodied flavors of orange marmalade and Madagascar vanilla bean. The finish is long with notes of sweet oak and ripe sultanas with perfectly balanced heat.

68 Breckenridge Distiller’s High Proof Blend Bourbon Whiskey

Aromas of rich butter caramel and toasted almond paste. Medium body with a luscious vanilla sugar flavor and a long balanced finish.

Breckenridge Spiced Whiskey

Bryan Nolt founded Breckenridge Distillery in 2007. His story an inspiring one of success, and resilience, involving selling his own house to keep the business up and running. Within ten years of opening the distillery, Breckenridge has produced highly-acclaimed whiskeys, with huge industry appeal. Situated in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, Breckenridge Distillery makes one of the best bourbons in the world. The distillery, which is only 4,000 square feet itself, is situated 9,600 feet above sea level, making it the highest distillery in the world. There, Jordan Via — Breckenridge's master distiller — ferments a mash of 56% corn, 38% rye and 6% malted barley in an open-top Scottish fermenter before distilling it twice through a $140,000, 550-gallon, Vendome copper-pot still originally made in Kentucky. After distillation, the bourbon is aged at 120 proof in American white oak casks with a number 3 char for approximately three years and is then brought to proof using pure Rocky Mountain snowmelt from atop Mount Quandry, which has a 14,000 foot peak. "In Breckenridge, we have fresh snowmelt water that's full of minerals and has its own flavor," says Bryan Nolt, Breckenridge Distillery's founder and CEO. "The pH is perfect and the minerals add taste to our spirits just as salt adds flavor to foods," he says. Their complex high rye bourbon garnered much critical acclaim, winning a Double Gold Medal at the Denver International Spirits Competition in 2012. The Breckenridge bourbon also scored 96 points — one point above Pappy Van Winkle's 23 year-old bourbon — at the Ultimate Spirits Challenge in New York City. Their Spiced whiskey expression is ultimately one of their most aromatic expressions. “Our infamous apothecary is wide open with this aromatic expression of carefully selected whole roots and Winter spices infused by hand with International renowned, gold medal-winning, Breckenridge Bourbon” (producer).

$44 Breckenridge Bourbon Whiskey

Situated in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, Breckenridge Distillery makes one of the best bourbons in the world. The distillery, which is only 4,000 square feet itself, is situated 9,600 feet above sea level, making it the highest distillery in the world. There, Jordan Via — Breckenridge's master distiller — ferments a mash of 56% corn, 38% rye and 6% malted barley in an open-top Scottish fermenter before distilling it twice through a $140,000, 550-gallon, Vendome copper-pot still originally made in Kentucky. After distillation, the bourbon is aged at 120 proof in American white oak casks with a number 3 char for approximately three years and is then brought to proof using pure Rocky Mountain snowmelt from atop Mount Quandry, which has a 14,000 foot peak. "In Breckenridge, we have fresh snowmelt water that's full of minerals and has its own flavor," says Bryan Nolt, Breckenridge Distillery's founder and CEO. "The pH is perfect and the minerals add taste to our spirits just as salt adds flavor to foods," he says. The taste of Breckenridge Bourbon is certainly turning heads. The unusually high rye content gives it depth and complexity, and earned Breckenridge Bourbon one of just three Gold Medals awarded at the 2011 International Wine and Spirits Competition in the United Kingdom. With a deep-amber hue and notes of pepper and toasted sesame, the bourbon also won the Double Gold Medal at the Denver International Spirits Competition in 2012 and scored 96 points — one point above Pappy Van Winkle's 23 year-old bourbon — at the Ultimate Spirits Challenge in New York City. Tasting Notes: Notes of banana, brown sugar and toasted sesame. Light body with a warm texture and long, vanilla finish.

$60 Breaker Hand Crafted Bourbon Whiskey

Located in the heart of California wine country and positioned between Terravant Winery on side side and Figueroa Mountain Brewery on the other, Ascendant Spirits is the first legal distillery to operate in Santa Barbara, CA since prohibition. “A few years ago, I started learning more about the craft distilling movement and realized that with the growth in the spirits market and the limited number of distilleries, there was a great opportunity,” says Steve Gertman, the distillery’s founder. Gertman fell in love with whisky on a trip to Scotland in 1998, and finally, 15 years later, opened up the doors to Ascendant Spirits in the spring of 2013. Ascendant Spirits is outfitted with its own custom, American-made, 500-gallon copper pot still, built entirely to Gertman’s — who also serves as Ascendant’s Master Distiller — specifications. Outside of the distillery’s walls, the Santa Rita Hills also play an enormous part in Ascendant’s final product. During the day, an intense humidity. Vanilla, candy corn, cinnamon and a touch of smoke on the nose. Palate filled with caramel, taffy and graham crackers, leading to an extremely smooth finish accented by honey and chocolate chip cookies.

$45 Buck 8 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

The use of wooden barrels to store and transport liquids dates back to 2690 B.C., when ancient Egyptians during the Early Dynastic Period began replacing clay vessels with wooden casks in order to meet the demands of their sprawling civilization. The advantages of wooden barrels were evident — not only were they less fragile than clay vessels, but their cylindrical shape allowed them to be rolled rather than carried across short distances. As settlers along the Nile quickly realized, however, barrels made from wooden staves imparted a unique color and flavor profile to the liquids stored within. Buck 8 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is matured for a minimum of eight years in new American oak casks under the intense Kentucky sun. As a result of this maturation process, the bourbon has a caramel color, along with an aroma of vanilla, dark fruits, creme brûlée and honey. The aroma gives way to notes of cherries, maple syrup, waffle cones and wood spices on the palate, and leads to a finish accented by touches of caramel, charcoal and cocoa. The bourbon earned the Bronze Medal at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition, and earned a score of 91 points from the Beverage Testing Institute.

Buffalo Trace Experimental Bourbons

Rice: Aroma of caramel and baking spices. Notes of vanilla, toffee and oak fade to flavors of brown rice and a touch of malted sweetness. Situated on the Kentucky River in Frankfort, Buffalo Trace Distillery takes its name from an ancient pathway that migrating buffalo used when travelling westward. The trail was well-known among Native Americans and was eventually used by pioneering settlers who crossed the Ohio River and followed the buffalo trace to the Western frontier. The distillery, which stands as the oldest distilling site in the United States, has a rich tradition of experimentation and innovation. "Toying with barrels is fun and interesting," says Harlen Wheatley, master distiller at Buffalo Trace Distillery and a Kentucky native. After graduating from Northern Kentucky University with a Bachelor's of Science degree in Chemistry, Wheatley began working for a chemical company while taking classes in Chemical Engineering at the University of Kentucky. Since 1995, he has been working at Buffalo Trace Distillery and has been master distiller for nearly a decade. At any given time, Buffalo Trace has up to 1,500 different casks of experimental whiskies maturing in its rickhouses. While most bourbons are made from a mash of corn, malted barley and rye, some distilleries like to experiment with the final ingredient. For instance, Pappy van Winkle and Larceny Bourbon both replace rye with wheat as their final ingredient. Buffalo Trace Experimental Rice Bourbon Whiskey and Oat Bourbon Whiskey replace the rye with rice and oats, respectively. "For this experiment, we were curious to taste what would happen when we substituted the rye grain in our traditional recipe with other grains like rice and oats," says Wheatley. "The results are very different from each other and different than typical bourbon, but both are pleasant surprises."Both the rice bourbon and oats bourbon were each distilled on April 20, 2002 and matured on seventh floor of Warehouse I for 9 years and 5 months. Buffalo Trace Rice Bourbon Whiskey has an aroma of caramel and baking spices. The initial palette is surprising, with a crisp and light flavor. The notes of vanilla, toffee and oak fade to flavors of brown rice and a touch of malted sweetness. Buffalo Trace Oats Bourbon Whiskey has a smoky nose with notes of oak and woody spice. Notes of figs and dried fruits fade to bold and bitter notes of oak and oats. Buffalo Trace Experimental Hot Box Toasted Barrel Bourbon is made by maturing a unique mash of Buffalo Trace Bourbon for nearly 17 years in toasted barrels. The barrels are created by heating the oak staves that comprise the barrel in a hot box — an appliance often used to heat foods — at 133 degrees Fahrenheit. After the staves have been toasted, they are steamed before being assembled into a barrel. This method of coopering allows the barrels to develop a unique flavor profile, which is ultimately transferred to the maturing bourbon. Buffalo Trace Experimental Hot Box Toasted Barrel Bourbon was aged for 16 years and 8 months, and has notes of dried fruits and vanilla, which are complemented by a caramel and buttery taste. Buffalo Trace Experimental #7 Heavy Char Barrel Bourbon Whiskey is also made by maturing a unique mash of Buffalo Trace Bourbon. The barrels used in this experiment were charred for 3.5 minutes, as opposed to the normal 55 second char typically used by Buffalo Trace Distillery. As a result, the bourbon, which was aged for 15 years and 9 months, has an oaky aroma followed by a heavy, complex body. The robust notes of smoke and wood and complemented by hints of vanilla, fruits and toffee.

$35 Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Situated on the Kentucky River in Frankfort, Kentucky, Buffalo Trace Distillery takes its name from an ancient pathway that migrating buffalo used when travelling westward. The trail was well-known among Native Americans and was eventually used by pioneering settlers who crossed the Ohio River and followed the buffalo trace to the Western frontier. Buffalo Trace Distillery is the oldest continually operating distillery in the United States, and includes the rich legacies of master distillers such as E.H. Taylor, Jr, George T. Stagg, Albert B. Blanton, Orville Schupp and Elmer T. Lee. Today, the distillery is still family-owned, operating on the same 130 acres of land adjacent the Kentucky River as it has for over 200 years. Similarly, the distillery’s flagship bourbon has been made using the same process for over 200 years. Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of yellow #2 dent corn, plump rye grains and malted barley, which is cooked and cooled before. Deep amber color, along with an aroma of vanilla, caramel, mint and molasses. Palate offers sweet notes of brown sugar and toffee, which give way to oak, dark fruits, baking spices and anise. The finish is both mellow and complex, with lingering notes of vanilla, oak and rock candy.

$40 Burnside Four Year Straight Bourbon Whiskey

In Southeast Portland, a handful of distilleries are leading the craft spirits revolution, making handcrafted, locally distilled spirits for the first time since Prohibition. This inconspicuous neighborhood — which was previously home to warehouses and light industrial buildings — has been dubbed “Distillery Row”, and Eastside Distilling has been at the forefront of this movement since opening on Distillery Row in 2008. Eastside Distilling’s master distiller, Melissa Heim, is the only female master distiller based west of the Mississippi. A Portland native, Heim started as a brewer before becoming Rogue Distillery’s master distiller and ultimately, master distiller at Eastside Distilling in 2012. “Luckily for me, a big part of making spirits is the art — and I understood that,” says Heim. “I get flavors and I knew what I wanted to make, and it was just a matter of how to get there.” Eastside Distilling’s Burnside Four Year Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of 79 percent corn and 21 percent rye and malted barley before being aged in brand-new, American oak barrels for a minimum of four years. Once each individual barrel has been aged and approved by Heim, she vats similar barrels together to find the perfect mixture of heat and sweet, and bottles everything at 96 proof. Burnside Four Year Straight Bourbon Whiskey has a slightly fruity aroma, with notes of candied apples, cinnamon, citrus and vanilla leading to an interesting palate filled with tropical mango, raisins, dark chocolate and granola. Rye grains and breakfast cereal stand out on the finish, which is long and dry. Burnside Four Year Straight Bourbon Whiskey earned a Gold Medal from the Beverage Testing Institute — pickup a bottle today!

$45 Bulleit 10 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Dark caramel color, along with an aroma of toasted oak, rich caramel and sweet fruits. Notes of woody spices, cloves and oak give way to hints of dried fruits, light vanilla and spicy rye on the palate. Long, slightly sweet finish. Very bold flavor profile.

$45 Bulleit Kentucky Straight Bourbon

Caramel color. Aroma of charred oak, rich caramel and warm spices. Notes of oak, allspice and cinnamon give way to hints of creamy vanilla, roasted nuts and rye bread on the palate. Long, slightly sweet finish.

$50 Calumet Farm Bourbon Whiskey

In 1924, William Monroe Wright, a successful entrepreneur and owner of Calumet Baking Powder Company, established a farm in the beautiful Bluegrass pasturelands of Lexington Kentucky. The farm would go on to win eight (8) Kentucky Derbies and two (2) Triple Crowns. It's with these high standards that Calumet Farm Bourbon Whiskey embodies the tradition and excellence of Kentucky Bourbon and thoroughbred racing. Bottled from hand selected barrels, Calumet has a customary mash bill of corn, rye and malted barley that offers a sweet, flawless finish. Glowing with butterscotch and soft oak, Calumet’s harmonious perfection of wood and caramel is admirably balanced with complex flavors of light brown sugar and soft white pepper.

$110 Coppersea Excelsior Bourbon Whisky

Named for the sea of copper stills that dotted New York’s Hudson Valley throughout the 19th century — before Prohibition, the region was a bonafide hub for whiskey distilling — Coppersea Distillery strives to produce spirits in a manner reminiscent of those 19th century New York farmstead distilleries. “We want what we’re doing to be incredibly primitive,” explains Angus MacDonald, owner and master distiller at Coppersea. At Coppersea Distillery, which is situated near Holy Cross Monastery on a bluff above the Hudson River, “heritage distilling” includes a green malting process which has been little used in the past 300 years. While most distilleries purchase their grain already malted and dried, Coppersea floor malts its grain — all of which is sourced locally — at the distillery and is one of only a handful of distilleries to still use this technique. This special process allows the grain to sprout over the course of five days, converting starch into precious sugars and enzymes which are needed to feed the yeast that’s added during fermentation. While risky — the grain can mold if left moist for too long — the payoff is big, producing a uniquely aromatic spirit full of fresh, hearty flavor. Coppersea is one of the rare distilleries in the world that malts its grain in-house. Coppersea whiskies are double distilled using a fire copper technique, directly firing their still to create flavors that would otherwise be left out in a steam-jacketed distillation. Direct firing allows the mash to caramelize as it cooks, giving Coppersea spirits an enhanced flavor profile that lends itself to a rich mouthfeel and depth of complexity and flavor. Excelsior Bourbon touts itself as the first 100% New York Bourbon. This New York dram is crafted from pure Hudson Valley grains, and aged in New York-harvested American white oak barrels. Being aged in New York oak, makes this spirit unique, as it may quite possibly be the only bourbon since Prohibition to carry this distinction. Coppersea worked with US barrel to develop the first tight barrel cooperage in the Northeast in generations The bourbon -which is named after the state motto Excelsior, meaning “Ever Upward”- is made from 100 percent Hudson Valley corn, rye, and barley. A New York trifecta, this bourbon embodies an authentic New York terroir.

$50 Charles Goodnight Kentucky Straight Bourbon

William "Bill" Foley II, the great-great-nephew of Texas Ranger, cattle herder and "father of the Texas Panhandle" Charles Goodnight, has followed in his pioneering uncle's footsteps. A consummate entrepreneur, Foley is the ex-chairman of a Fortune 500 company, owner of a working cattle ranch and golf resort in Montana and founder of Foley Family Wines, where he began his foray into the wine and spirits industry. Rich aromas of oak and vanilla, leading to honey, birthday cake and cinnamon spice on the palate. Finish is long and smooth, accented with more oak and leather. Taking full advantage of his creativity and connections (Foley spoke at length with Wild Turkey to find the perfect recipe for his whiskey), Foley has been working tirelessly over the past several years preparing to launch his newest product: Charles Goodnight Kentucky Straight Bourbon, a nod to his late ancestor. Charles Goodnight Kentucky Straight Bourbon is aged for roughly six years and bottled at a robust 100 proof. "My great-great-uncle was a tough guy and a big bourbon drinker," says Foley. "He wouldn't have wanted an 80-proof bourbon."

$44 Clyde May’s Straight Bourbon Whiskey

After serving in World War II, legend has it that Clyde May returned to his native Alabama to raise his eight children and tend to the farm that he had purchased before the war began. Like many farmers at the time, Clyde would distill the excess grains he harvested into corn whiskey — "branch-farming," he liked to call it. From the 1950s to the 1980s, May managed to produce nearly 300 gallons of whiskey a week just southeast of Montgomery in a still that he had designed and built himself. While much of May's whiskey was sold unaged, a portion of the whiskey he produced was aged in charred oak casks into which dried apples were dropped in order to enhance the flavor. Always distilling whiskey outside the law, May was arrested in 1973 and served an 18-month sentence at the Maxwell Air Force Base. "He sure had a reputation for making fine whiskey," said Thomas Allison, a former officer with the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. Upon his release, May gave up his cell to the man who convicted him — Attorney General John Mitchell, who was convicted in 1974 on charges relating to the Watergate scandal. After May's death in 1990, his son, Kenny, took up the family business and began working with Kentucky Bourbon Distillers to produce a whiskey in honor of his father. Clyde May's Straight Bourbon Whiskey is a five-year-old whiskey, aged in heavily “alligator” charred new American oak barrels, non-chilled filtered and bottled at 92 proof. With a mash bill of 78% corn, 12% rye, and 10% barley, Clyde May's bourbon is a venture away from their traditional, coined and trade-marked Alabama Style whiskey, which has oven-dried apples added to barrels of new-make whiskey. This straight bourbon was first launched in September of 2016, on Clyde May’s birthday and during National Bourbon Heritage Month. The release received a Gold medal in the New York World Wine & Spirits Competition and a 93 rating in the Ultimate Spirits Challenge.

$70 Dry Fly Washington Bourbon 101

"The stills are the pretty part," says Don Poffenroth as he points to his twin, custom-designed 450-liter Christian Carl copper-pot stills. Manufactured in Goppingen, Germany, the stills travelled over seven thousand miles to Dry Fly Distillery's home in Spokane, Washington, and today, are used to make Dry Fly's line of craft spirits. Poffenroth and his co-founder, Kent Fleischmann, were inspired to open the doors to Dry Fly Distillery when they were knee-deep in the Gallatin River during a fly-fishing trip. "It was still early and the sun was rising slowly behind the alders," says Fleischmann. "It occurred to us how privileged we were to live, work, and fish in one of the most amazing places on Earth. We felt so fortunate that we wanted to find some way to share the natural beauty and purity of the great Northwest." Dry Fly Washington Bourbon 101 is made from a mash of 60% corn, 20% wheat and 20% barley. "All the ingredients for our bourbon were sourced locally from Washington," says Poffenroth. After mashing and fermenting the grains, Poffenroth and Fleischmann distill the wash through their twin Christian Carl copper-pot stills before maturing the bourbon in new, charred American oak casks. "Our bourbon has aged in full-sized, 53-gallon casks for three years," says Fleischmann. The bourbon has a slightly spicy nose with notes of cinnamon, vanilla and oak. The entry has notes of caramel and toffee, that are balanced by notes of clove and allspice mid-palate. The finish is long and slightly sweet. Dry Fly Washington Bourbon earned the Gold Medal at the World Spirits Awards in 2014. In addition, it earned the Double Gold Medal at the San Diego International Spirits Competition, where it was named "Best in Show."

$40 Duke Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Federal regulations in the United States require that bourbon be made from a mashbill of at least 51% corn before being aged in new oak barrels and bottled at 80 proof or higher. Bourbon that meets these requirements and that has been aged for a minimum of at least two years may be called straight bourbon.Duke Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is a straight bourbon whiskey that is made by marrying together casks of bourbon that have aged for between five and ten years. The bourbon is crafted in homage to John Wayne, whose nickname was "Duke." Created by Ethan Wayne (Duke's son), the bourbon's flavor profile was made to reflect Wayne's personal whiskey preferences, which were preserved for over five decades and were only recently discovered. The bourbon has a distinctively fruity aroma, with notes of nutmeg, maple syrup, caramel, toffee, roasted corn and mellow char on the palate. The finish is bold and spicy, with a hint of cloves, rye and ginger. "My father thrived on new projects and adventures and he always loved a great glass of whiskey at the end of the day," says Ethan Wayne. "Our goal with the Duke was to make a Bourbon that embodies the spirit, strength and richness my father personified while realizing his unfulfilled dream of distilling fine spirits."

$35 Eagle Rare 10 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Golden honey color, along with an aroma of gentle toast, fresh tobacco and bananas. Notes of chocolate, almonds, melons, raisins and dried fruits on the palate, which are complemented by a subtle vanilla undertone. Finish is long and fierce, with hints of roasted nuts and corn.

Elijah Craig Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Aroma of honey, sweet corn, vanilla and brown sugar. Notes of roasted nuts, creamy vanilla, molasses and tropical fruits on the palate, that are well-balanced by hints of dry oak and cinnamon. Finish is long and sweet, and ends with a warming touch!

Evan Williams Single Barrel Vintage Bourbon

After emigrating from Wales to Kentucky in 1783, Evan Williams established a distillery along the banks of the Ohio River. The location of his eponymous distillery, situated on the banks of the Ohio River, is officially marked, declaring Evan Williams as Kentucky’s First Commercial Distiller. Evan Williams was an American pioneer being one of the first distillers in the US to use corn. The Evan Williams brand was founded in celebration of Williams. Heaven Hill produces their signature bourbons which are bottled in Bardstown, Kentucky. Evan Williams has long been ranked as one of the world's best-selling whiskey brands. Heaven Hill distillery was founded in 1935, Immediately after Prohibition ended in the United States in 1933, after a group of investors decided to be ready for the rebounding market. The investors including the famous Joseph L. Beam. Heaven Hill is located on a massive estate boasting 22 multi-story rick-houses across hundreds of acres of land. Now known as the “ Heaven Hill Bernheim Distillery” they have the second-largest inventory of Bourbon Whiskey in the world. It is also the only remaining family-owned distillery in Kentucky. Evan Williams has a diverse core lineup, including their very popular signature Black Label, as well as some limited releases. Every year since 1983 Master Distiller Parker Beam (and now his son Craig) have chosen select barrels for their single barrel series, barrels selected to their exact specifications. This Evan Williams Single Barrel Vintage Bourbon is a five-time "Whiskey of the Year" award winner. This series is vintage dated, meaning each bottle is marked with the vintage date it was put into oak, along with the year it was bottled and the exact serial number of the single barrel that the Bourbon was drawn from. Carefully handcrafted for 7-8 years in the barrel, this premium and highly acclaimed Bourbon has notes of tropical fruit, vanilla and caramel and peanuts. Bottled at 43% ABV.

$50 Few Bourbon Whiskey

Hidden down a dark alley in a former chop shop, skilled men are quietly violating one of Evanston's founding principles: Prohibition. In the 19th century, Frances Elizabeth Willard was elected President of the Chicago Woman's Christian Temperance Union and embarked on a decade-long crusade to prohibit alcohol in the United States. Willard worked tirelessly; as President of the WCTU, she traveled roughly 30,000 miles and gave an average of 400 lectures each year for an entire decade. As a result, Evanston remained a dry town for over 100 years. It wasn't until Paul Hletko, owner and master distiller at Few Spirits, began lobbying the town that the antiquated laws were lifted. "I'm the vice president of the PTA at my kids' school and I coach their soccer and T-ball teams,"Hletko says. "People around town know me and what I'm about, which is handy when you're looking to change 100 years of laws." Today, Hletko and his team of master distillers produce Few Bourbon Whiskey in the heart of Evanston, Illinois. Few Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of 70% corn, 20% barley and 10% rye. "The corn comes from a farmers co-op in Indiana and my barley and rye from farmers in Wisconsin," notes Hletko. After mashing and fermenting the grains, Hletko distills the wash through his 1,500-liter Kothe copper-pot still. After distillation, the bourbon is aged in custom-made oak barrels from Minnesota. "The cooper I eventually chose to make our barrels won 24 out of 25 categories at a spirits competition I visited," Hletko says. "I'm no math major, but that's the cooper I want to make our barrels." The #3 char on the barrels contributes slightly sweet hints of honey and vanilla to Few Bourbon, which are nicely balanced by a spicy finish that intensifies as it lingers. After aging the bourbon, Hletko and his team of distillers fill and label each bottle by hand. Few Bourbon Whiskey earned a Gold Medal from the Beverage Testing Institute and a Silver Medal at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition in 2012. As one of the leading figures of the Temperance movement, it's unlikely that Frances Elizabeth Willard would approve of Hletko's success or the name he chose for his distillery, which is sometimes written as F.E.W. Spirits.

$40 Filibuster Kentucky Dual Cask Straight Bourbon

The filibuster is a powerful parliamentary procedure in the United States Senate that allows a Senator to speak indefinitely on any subject of his or her choosing in order to prevent a vote on legislation. In order to defeat a filibuster, Senate rules require that at least 60 senators vote to end debate and bring the legislation to a vote. The record for the longest filibuster is held by former Senator Strom Thurmond, who spoke for 24 hours and 18 minutes on the floor of the United States Senate. During the filibuster, cots were brought in from a nearby hotel for other Senators to rest while Thurmond discussed increasingly irrelevant and obscure topics, including his grandmother's biscuit recipe. (On September 24, 2013, Senator Ted Cruz spoke on the floor of the Senate for 21 hours and 19 minutes, the fourth longest speech in the history of the Senate). "Filibuster Whiskey is so good," says Sid Dilawri, the brand's founder, "that you won't stop talking about it." Filibuster Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of 75% corn, 21% rye and 4% malted barley. After the grains have been milled and mashed, they are distilled in Kentucky before being aged in virgin, American oak casks. The casks, which are crafted by hand-assembling air-dried staves and then charring the interior of the cask over an open flame, give the bourbon its signature notes of sweet caramel, creamy vanilla and honeyed oak. After the bourbon has aged for a minimum of three years (although the average age of the bourbon is closer to eight years), it is double-barreled, or finished, in French oak casks that were previously used to mature wine. The French oak casks are more tightly grained than the American oak casks, and impart unique notes of dried fruit, honey and grapes to the bourbon. After a 60-day slumber in the French oak barrels, Filibuster Bourbon is brought to proof and each bottle is filled and labeled by hand.

$48 Four Roses Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey Four Roses Distillery

Spicy aroma, with hints of cedar, cloves and cinnamon. Notes of red plums, apples and berries dominate the palate, and are well-balanced by hints of peppercorn and toasted rye. Finish is smooth and soft, and ends with a touch of vanilla.

$45 Four Roses Single Barrel Kentucky Straight Bourbon

A nose of plum and cherries, the bourbon is well-balanced and has notes of maple syrup, cinnamon and nutmeg.

$35 Four Roses Yellow Label Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey Four Roses Distillery

Aroma of honey and poached pears that gives way to notes of crisp, fresh fruits and apples on the palate. Finish is soft and smooth.

$90 Garrison Brothers Texas Straight Bourbon Whiskey Garrison Brothers Distillery

Rich, deep aroma of butterscotch, nutmeg, vanilla and coconut. Notes of caramelized oranges and fruit dominate the palate, along with touches of melted butter, whipped cream and oak. Finish is smooth, with touches of toffee, milk chocolate and espresso.

$55 Henry DuYore’s Straight Bourbon Whiskey Ransom Spirits

Perched in the hills of Northwest Oregon, Ransom Distillery sits on a forty acre farm just outside Sheridan and is surrounded by grapevines and barley plants. The distillery, named after the funds it took to get it open, is owned and operated by Tad Seestedt. "I had always wanted to start my own business," Seestedt says, "and I thought that Ransom was an appropriate name in that its definition is buying your freedom or independence with money. The money I had to borrow from the bank to start the business was my Ransom." Ransom Spirits' Henry DuYore's Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of approximately 56% corn, 31% rye and 13% barley. After the grains are milled, mashed and fermented, the wash is distilled in small batches inside a 300-gallon Pruehlo Cognac copper pot still. The still's unique shape and size allows the bourbon to retain deeper aromas and more texture as compared to ordinary stills. After distillation, the bourbon is aged inside new, charred American oak barrels before being finished in French oak casks. The French oak finishing process lends an additional layer of complexity to the bourbon — French oak is highly prized since it is loosely grained and more porous than American oak, allowing it to impart more flavor and tannins to whiskey that it contacts. While federal regulations mandate that straight bourbon be aged for a minimum of two years, Henry DuYore's Straight Bourbon Whiskey is aged for a minimum of four years. After aging, the bourbon is brought to proof and each bottle is filled, labeled and sealed by hand. Named after a reformed moonshiner, Henry DuYoure's Bourbon has notes of sweet, yellow corn that are nicely balanced by the spicy rye. In addition, the liberal amount of barley in the bourbon's mashbill adds viscosity and depth, while the barrel notes provide for a subtle undertone of dried fruit, honey and toffee. The bourbon earned a score of 93 points from Wine Enthusiast, which named it one of the Top 50 Spirits of 2013.

$40 Henry McKenna Single Barrel 10 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Heaven Hill Distillery

Aroma of warm spices, smoke and burnt caramel. Notes of chewy leather, chili peppers and habanero, which are complemented by subtle touches of dried fruits, vanilla and cinnamon. Finish is warm and lush, with bold notes of roasted corn, cloves and woody spices. In 1837, Henry McKenna emigrated from Ireland to the United States. After spending nearly two decades as a farmer in Kentucky, McKenna founded an eponymous distillery in 1855. At the time, McKenna focused on the production of wheat whiskey (the only crop he was harvesting at the time) and was able to distill enough whiskey to fill one barrel each day. As word of McKenna's high-quality whiskey spread, McKenna was able to triple his distillation capacity, and began experimenting with the production of bourbon. Following his death in 1893, McKenna's three sons — Daniel, Stafford and James — began operating the business. Today, Henry McKenna Single Barrel 10 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey honors the rich family tradition and pioneering spirit of the McKenna family. The bourbon, which is made from a mash of primarily corn, is the only extra-aged bottled-in-bond single barrel bourbon available today. Pursuant to the Bottled-In-Bond Act of 1897 (27 C.F.R. 5.21), any spirit...

$45 High West American Prairie Bourbon High West Distillery

More than two hundred years ago, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set forth on a journey that would take them through the Great Plains, along the banks of the Yellowstone River and finally, to the beaches of the Pacific Ocean. At the time, the Great Plains abounded with millions of bison, pronghorn antelope, deer and elk. In addition, immense flocks of birds blanketed the open sky. High West American Prairie Bourbon pays tribute to the expedition of Lewis and Clark and to the frontiersman who pioneered the west. Made from a secret blend of a 2 year old bourbon from Indiana (made from a mash of 75% corn, 20% rye and 5% barley), a 6 year old bourbon from Kentucky, and a 13 year old bourbon from Kentucky, American Prairie is finished in American white oak casks with a #2 char on the heads and a #4 char on the staves. The varied char of each cask gives the bourbon a unique flavor profile " it has strong notes of vanilla and caramel married with notes of blood oranges and dark cherries. Ten percent of the profits from the sale of each bottle of American Prairie will be donated to the American Prairie Foundation. The American Prairie Foundation is assembling the largest wildlife preserve in the continental United States, which, when complete, will be 5,000 square miles or roughly the size of Connecticut. "High West is passionate about the American West " our home " and more importantly we want to help preserve its culture, heritage, and natural beauty," says David Perkins, High West's manager. High West American Prairie is a limited release, limited edition blend of bourbons. It earned a score of 92 points from Wine Enthusiast and was named "one of the ten best new bourbons" by Men's Health.

$110 Hillrock Solera Aged Bourbon Whiskey (Sauternes Cask Finished)

The nose is full of caramel, dried fruit, vanilla, oak and spice, with a light floral aroma. The palate is full-bodied with decadent notes of brown sugar, molasses, toffee, butterscotch apricots, honey, peaches, roasted corn, clove, cinnamon and a small hint of spicy rye. The finish is well-balanced.

$44 I.W. Harper Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Isaac Bernheim immigrated to the United States in 1867 with only $4 in his pocket — while he intended to work in New York City upon his arrival, his future employer went out of business and as a result, Bernheim became a traveling salesman, riding his horse throughout rural Pennsylvania and peddling goods to housewives until his horse died. Bernheim then moved to Paducah, Kentucky and became a bookkeeper for a liquor wholesaler, eventually saving enough money to bring his brother Bernard to the United States. In 1872, Isaac and his brother established their own company — Bernheim Brothers — and together purchased a distillery in Louisville, Kentucky and began to produce I.W. Harper Bourbon. While I.W. stood for “Isaac Wolfe”, the given name of the older Bernheim, the brothers chose the name “Harper” over their own surname because it, “sounded more American.” Bernheim Distillery was one of just ten distilleries granted permission to operate during Prohibition for medicinal purposes, and I.W. Harper Bourbon grew in popularity throughout the 20th century until it was cleared from U.S. shelves in the early 1990s. Now, for the first time in over two decades, I.W. Harper is being made available again. I.W. Harper Bourbon is distilled from a mash of 73% corn, 18% rye and 9% barley and aged at the Stitzel-Weller distillery for a minimum of four years in new American oak. As a result, the whiskey has an aroma of shortbread, butterscotch, vanilla and walnuts. The palate is filled with almonds and fruitcake, and leads to a finish accented by chocolate, lumber and caramel.

$40 James E. Pepper 1776 100 Proof Straight Rye Whiskey

Elijah Pepper started a legacy in whiskey distilling at the dawn of the American Revolution. Pepper also built the first log cabin distillery in Versailles, during the Kentucky War of 1812. The family business was passed on to his son, Oscar, and then on to his grandson, James E. Pepper. Colonel James E. Pepper experienced life as one of Kentucky's first Bourbon aristocrats. As an elite he raced thoroughbreds in the Kentucky Derby, traveled in a private rail car and made the Old Fashioned cocktail famous. “Pepper Whiskey is an old fashioned whiskey, made in the old time way from a formula used for more than 100 years by three generations of the Pepper family,” wrote James, in an advertisement dated August 22, 1887. “We claim not only to make the oldest but absolutely the purest and best brand of whiskey made in America, and we invite comparison with any whiskey of any age.” In 1958, after the whiskey industry fell on hard times, the James E. Pepper Distillery was forced to close its doors. During its tenure, Pepper Whiskey, or “Old 1776 Whiskey” as it became it known, was a favorite of Presidents Andrew Jackson and Ulysses S. Grant, and was preferred by Daniel Webster, a leading American statesman and senator from Massachusetts. “Before re-launching this iconic brand,” says Amir Peay, “we did extensive research and spent years collecting and analyzing full, preserved bottles of original Pepper Whiskey.” Peay even acquired a letter written by Pepper himself, detailing the exact mashbill and recipe used to create Old 1776. “We wanted to pay homage to Pepper's legacy and do our best to recreate the original Pepper Whiskey — something that was part of American history,” he says.” James E. Pepper Rye is a bourbon-esque, fruity whiskey with a 90% rye mash bill, it’s bottled at 50% ABV. On the nose are spicy notes of rye, with hints of clove and cinnamon underneath. On the Palate are flavors of Orange zest, clove, honeysuckle, heavy rye bread, oak. The finish is long and spicy.

$43 J.R. Ewing Private Reserve Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Federal regulations in the United States require that bourbon be made from a mashbill of at least 51% corn before being aged in new oak barrels and bottled at 80 proof or higher. Bourbon that meets these requirements and that has been aged for a minimum of at least two years in Kentucky may be called Kentucky straight bourbon.J.R. Ewing Private Reserve Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey has a mashbill of 81% corn, 13% rye and 6% malted barley, and is aged for a minimum of four years. The bourbon is crafted in homage to J.R. Ewing, one of the most memorable characters in the hit television series Dallas. A ruthless and cunning Texas oil baron whose drink of choice was bourbon, Ewing was well-known for his discerning taste. “Creating a brand of such high quality is reflective of J.R.’s thirst for the best in life, and the new brand really pays tribute to the character with whom everyone around the world is familiar,” said Andy Harmon, co-founder of Southfork Bottling Company. Sweet and subtle nose, with notes of vanilla, oak, caramel and sweet tea. Finish is incredibly smooth, with light orange and honey textures that linger.

Jefferson’s Reserve Groth Reserve Cask Finish Very Old Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Starbright aroma of peaches, blackberries, caramel corn and toffee, which leads to a palate marked by burnt oak, red wine, cinnamon spice and dark and dried fruits. Finish is long and dry, with lasting notes of sweet tobacco, cornbread and baked apples.

$200 Jefferson’s Presidential Select 21 Year Old Bourbon

Dark honey hue. Aroma of vanilla, molasses, caramel and roasted nuts. Initial notes of pecan pie and orange marmalade on the palate are complemented by touches of cinnamon, black pepper, cardamom and oak. Long, elegant finish has light floral undertones along with a smooth, vanilla cream flavor accented by a hint of caramel.

$140 Jefferson’s Grand Selection Chateau Pichon Baron Cask Finish

Notes of robust flavor of Bordeaux, toasted American and French oak on the nose. Strong flavors on the palate, with hints of chocolate and fresh brewed coffee. The finish is fruity and spicy with a very pronounced wine-forward flavor that lingers on the palate.

$150 Jefferson’s Grand Selection Chateau Suduiraut Sauternes Cask Finish

Citrus, floral and honey notes on the nose. Citrus, burnt sugar, cinnamon, caramel, and flavors of lemon zest on the palate. The finish balances exceptionally with the spices of the bourbon.

$60 Jefferson’s Chef Collaboration Straight Whiskey

Aroma of cherry, dried citrus and oak that gives way to notes of buttered biscuits, peaches and tart apples on the palate. Subtle touches of rye bread and spicy oak tannins linger, and lead to a finish accented by touches of citrus and cloves.

$70 Jefferson’s Reserve Pritchard Hill Cabernet Cask Finished Bourbon

Soft tannins and red wine aromas on the nose, with baking spices and earthy leathery notes. On the palate are sweet flavors of ripened fruits, dates, apricots, Cabernet, zesty lemon, and buttery baked goods. The finish is long and smoky, filled with oak tannins.

$100 Jefferson’s Reserve Old Rum Cask Finish Bourbon

Aroma of bananas, vanilla, and almond, leading to a palate of salt, spiced rum, maple, and dried fruits. The long finish leaves the taste of cereal grains lingering on the tongue.

35 Jefferson’s The Manhattan Barrel Finished Cocktail

Ripe aroma of Madeira wine and vanilla extract, which leads to a sharp palate filled with bitter herbs, vermouth and citrus. The finish is clean and lengthy, with soft notes of licorice, oak and root vegetables making the final statement. The principal author of the Declaration of Independence and one of the greatest Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson was elected the third President of the United States in 1800. During his tenure, Jefferson authorized the purchase of the Louisiana Territory, dispatched Lewis and Clark westward in order to explore the remainder of the continent and repealed the Whisky Excise Tax. After Jefferson retired from public office in 1815, he often tended to the garden that he had cultivated on his Monticello estate. At the time, it was customary for wealthy farmers, including Jefferson, to distill the excess grains they harvested from their farms into spirits (George Washington was one of the country’s largest distillers of rye whiskey). As a result, each farmer’s spirits were unique and reflected the local terrior of their farm. The Jefferson’s brand pays homage to Jefferson and the exquisite whiskey he distilled. Jefferson’s The Manhattan Barrel Finished Cocktail was developed by Jefferson’ s founder Trey Zoeller in partnership with David Granger, Editor-in-Chief of Esquire. The pair spent two years and dozens of attempts honing in on the perfect recipe, which they ultimately found by mixing Jefferson’s Bourbon, dry and sweet vermouth and barrel-aged spiced cherry bitters. The exact bourbon used is six years old — it started at 125 proof and was refined to 82.3 proof — and once mixed with the vermouth and bitters, the resulting liquid is aged for an additional 90 days in oak barrels before being bottled at 68 proof. As a result of this unique barrel-aging process, Jefferson’s The Manhattan Barrel Finished Cocktail has a ripe aroma of Madeira wine and vanilla extract, which leads to a sharp palate filled with bitter herbs, vermouth and citrus. The finish is clean and lengthy, with soft notes of licorice, oak and root vegetables making the final statement. “Esquire covers the wide-ranging interests of men and one of our primary passion points is drinking and the culture of drinking,” said Granger. “It’s been a joy working with Trey on finally putting our considerable drinking experience to some productive use. (It was also good to drink lots of his whiskey). And it’s particularly gratifying that our distinctive version of the classic cocktail tastes so damn good.”

Jefferson’s Ocean Aged at Sea Kentucky Straight Bourbon

Aroma of vanilla, caramel and burnt matches. Thick notes of butterscotch, vanilla, brown sugar, and salted caramel dominate the palate. Finish accented by sweet hints of citrus.

$60 Jefferson’s Reserve Very Old Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Gentle aromas of dried fruits, hay, hints of spice, cream and vanilla. Light and clean flavor with toffee sweetness and hints of cigar leaf and pepper. Long finish with lingering dry spice and sweetness.

$45 Jim Beam Single Barrel Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Sweet corn on the nose with vanilla, nutmeg, toffee and citrus, mint and nutty aromas. The palate mirrors the nose with nutty with notes of corn, vanilla, nutmeg oak, toffee, toasted bread, citrus, and fruit. The finish is medium length with nutty notes, spice, oak and cocoa.

$250 Jim Beam Distiller’s Masterpiece Sherry Cask Finished Bourbon

Following the end of the American Revolutionary War, Johannes Reginald Beam emigrated from Germany to the United States, and eventually settled in Kentucky County. At the time, Kentucky County was still considered part of Virginia, and was overseen by a military governor named John J. Bowman. In order to encourage westward expansion, Virginia issued pioneers who agreed to settle in Kentucky County “corn writs,” which granted the pioneers 60 acres of land if they agreed to settle in Kentucky and start farming corn. Aroma of dark, rich fruits, including plums, cherries, and raspberries. Notes of chewy leather, moist tobacco, coffee and dark chocolate on the palate. Bold, slightly sweet finish.

Knob Creek Small Batch Straight Rye Whiskey

Following the end of the American Revolutionary War, Johannes Reginald Beam emigrated from Germany to the United States and eventually settled in Kentucky County. At the time, Kentucky County was still considered part of Virginia and was overseen by a military governor named John J. Bowman. After settling in Kentucky, Beam began harvesting corn and set forth a family tradition by distilling the excess grains he harvested into whiskey. Since then, seven generations of the Beam family have been involved in whiskey production for the eponymous company (the company is actually named after James Beam, who rescued it following Prohibition). Knob Creek Bourbon was created by Beam’s grandson, Booker Noe, who after joining the family business in 1950 was promoted to Master Distiller just ten years later. Booker talked like a true Kentuckian and was known for his contagious personality, and through his launch of the “Small Batch Bourbon Collection” — the collection includes Knob Creek as well as Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s and Baker’s bourbons — he is often credited as the father of the small batch bourbon movement. Knob Creek Bourbon takes its name from the small water source, Knob Creek, that ran through President Abraham Lincoln’s childhood farm. Booker’s vision for Knob Creek Bourbon was that of an honest, quality bourbon that could meet the standards — strength, flavor, care, and patience — of bourbon made before prohibition distressed the industry just decades earlier. Like Abraham Lincoln himself, Booker designed Knob Creek Bourbon, to be honest, unwavering and full of character. Knob Creek offers a solid core lineup of whiskeys and bourbons, all of which have made the brand one of the most popular labels on the market today. Rye Whiskey has made a huge comeback in the industry in recent years, and Knob Creek’s small batch rye is a hallmark emblem of the resurgence of this born again fermented grain whiskey. With its expansive notes of herbs bold rye and nuanced elements of oak, and undertones of vanilla, it's no wonder that this rye is one of the most renowned whiskeys to date. Although they do not reveal its age statement (instead claiming “aged patiently” on its label), and information about their grain source is also undisclosed (instead stating that they source the “highest-quality rye to create the World’s Best Rye”), this exceptionally nuanced and flavorful whiskey won "Best Rye Worldwide Whiskey" at the 2016 International Wine and Spirits Competition.

$50 Knob Creek Smoked Maple Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Following the end of the American Revolutionary War, Johannes Reginald Beam emigrated from Germany to the United States, and eventually settled in Kentucky County. At the time, Kentucky County was still considered part of Virginia, and was overseen by a military governor named John J. Bowman. After settling in Kentucky, Beam began harvesting corn and set forth a family tradition by distilling the excess grains he harvested into whiskey. Since then, seven generations of the Beam family have been involved in whiskey production for the eponymous company (the company is actually named after James Beam, who rescued it following Prohibition). Knob Creek Bourbon was created by Beam’s grandson, Booker Noe, who after joining the family business in 1950 was promoted to Master Distiller just ten years later. Booker talked like a true Kentuckian and was known for his contagious personality, and through his launch of the “Small Batch Bourbon Collection” — the collection includes Knob Creek as well as Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s and Baker’s bourbons — he is often credited as the father of the small batch bourbon movement. Knob Creek Bourbon takes its name from the small water source, Knob Creek, that ran through President Abraham Lincoln’s childhood farm. Booker’s vision for Knob Creek Bourbon was that of an honest, quality bourbon that could meet the standards — strength, flavor, care and patience — of bourbon made before prohibition distressed the industry just decades earlier. Knob Creek Smoked Maple Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon is the venerable brand’s first foray into a flavored line. While there are a few different maple bourbons available by different distilleries, this is the first smoked maple bourbon that we’ve come across. It was released in honor of Booker Noe, who enjoyed not only distilling some of the first small batch bourbons, but pairing them with maple syrup, and meats he smoked himself! Like other bottles of Knob Creek, Smoked Maple Bourbon uses Kentucky limestone-filtered water, and is aged for nine years in deeply charred American white oak barrels to bring out bold flavors that harken back to the pre-Prohibition era. The maple syrup is added to the prized Knob Creek Small Batch after distillation is complete. Knob Creek Smoked Maple Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey has an aroma of maple, smoke, oak, vanilla, leather, nutmeg, and roasted stone fruit. It’s a bit weightier than their normal small batch bourbon, with a palate dominated by maple sugar and notes of smoked maplewood, followed by a drying woody finish that evolves into a lingering syrupy maple sweetness. Though this should probably be the last taste of the day due to its smokiness, Knob Creek Small Batch Smoked Maple shines in a cocktail or as an after dinner drink, and it’s equally well suited to a plate of pancakes, sausage, and bacon if that’s more your style.

$65 Knob Creek Reserve Single Barrel Bourbon Whiskey

Following the end of the American Revolutionary War, Johannes Reginald Beam emigrated from Germany to the United States, and eventually settled in Kentucky County. At the time, Kentucky County was still considered part of Virginia, and was overseen by a military governor named John J. Bowman. After settling in Kentucky, Beam began harvesting corn and set forth a family tradition by distilling the excess grains he harvested into whiskey. Since then, seven generations of the Beam family have been involved in whiskey production for the eponymous company (the company is actually named after James Beam, who rescued it following Prohibition). Knob Creek Bourbon was created by Beam’s grandson, Booker Noe, who after joining the family business in 1950 was promoted to Master Distiller just ten years later. Booker talked like a true Kentuckian and was known for his contagious personality, and through his launch of the “Small Batch Bourbon Collection” — the collection includes Knob Creek as well as Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s and Baker’s bourbons — he is often credited as the father of the small batch bourbon movement. Deep amber and henna color, as well as an aroma of toasted nuts, vanilla bean and oak. Palate is filled with dried fruits, maple syrup and a rum sweetness, and leads to a finish marked by a woody, cinnamon spice, evergreen and caramel.

Medley’s Private Stock 10 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Charles W. Medley, president of his namesake distillery in Owensboro, Kentucky, is a seventh generation master distiller. His family’s roots run back to the birth of Kentucky bourbon; while Reverend Elijah Craig is usually credited with producing the first bourbon whiskey at his mill in Lebanon in 1789, Medley’s ancestors were distilling whiskey at the same time in the adjacent county in Kentucky. In fact, except during the thirteen years during which distillation was outlawed in the United States, a member of the Medley family has been operating a distillery continuously since 1812. Following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, Thomas Aquinas Medley began production of a new bourbon in the heart of Kentucky. Thomas died shortly thereafter, but the Medley Distilling Company continued to produce Kentucky bourbon for the next five decades. Today, under the tutelage of Charles W. Medley and his son Samuel, the distillery (recently renamed the Charles Medley Distillery) continues to distill bourbon using the same recipes and techniques that generations of Medleys perfected over the past two centuries. Paying homage to Charles's great-great-grandfather, George Medley, who launched Medley’s “Private Stock” in 1873, Charles and Sam have recently decided to revive the “Private Stock” brand after discovering an old bottle in the distillery’s basement. Made from an old family recipe which uses rye as the secondary grain, Medley’s Private Stock 10 Year Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is aged for a minimum of ten years before being bottled at 90 proof. As a result, Medley’s Private Stock has an aroma of popcorn, caramel and melted butter, which leads to a palate filled with notes of french toast, apricot jam and rice pudding. The finish is sweet and complex, with notes of dried peaches and maple syrup lingering on the tongue. Only 1,000 cases of this limited-run bourbon will be released throughout the U.S. in 2015, so be sure to pick up a bottle today!

$80 Low Gap Bourbon Whiskey

Over three decades ago, Ansley Coale picked up a hitchhiker along Route 101 just north of San Francisco. The hitchhiker — Hubert Germain-Robin — was of French origin and came from a family that had been producing cognac since 1782. As the two drove northward in Coale's car, Hubert spoke of his family's background in distillation. "Hubert wanted to distill using craft methods handed down for centuries from master to apprentice," recalls Coale, who eventually teamed up with the hitchhiker to found Craft Distillers in 2003. After purchasing an antique cognac still from an abandoned distillery, Hubert and Coale built a redwood shed in northern California and began distilling spirits. "We bought the still to distill apples, but we also used it for grape spirits. We didn't realize how special it was until Crispin Cain began to distill whiskey on it — the still produces beautifully round, soft, elegant and complex whiskey.” Cain, who apprenticed with Hubert Germain-Robin for seven years before founding his Greenway Distillery in 2005, is responsible for the production of Low Gap spirits. He’s proved to be quite the wizard on the still, known for delivering award-winning spirits, Cain has been working with whiskey for many many years. His son, Devin Cain, is also a whiskey maven, having apprenticed under his father his blending skills are quite exquisite. All Low Gap whiskeys are double distilled by hand on the small antique 16HL cognac still at the Germain-Robin distillery in Ukiah California and cut to proof with filtered rain water. The unique antique still yields incredibly “subtle complex and flavorful distillates with superb length” (producer). Low Gap Straight Bourbon is double distilled from a mash bill of 65% corn, 20% malted barley, and 15% malted rye. Aged for at least two years in new charred oak bourbon barrels, this artisanal, earthy, grain-forward bourbon is bottled at 43.25% ABV.

$50 Maker’s 46 Bourbon

Hints of wood staves on the nose, caramel, and sweetness. The palate harbors rich complex flavors, a crescendo of wood blending with deep, complex, rich notes of vanilla and caramel, The finish is smooth a subtle. On October 1, 1953, William Samuels Sr. purchased Burks Distillery, which was situated in Loretto, Kentucky, for $35,000. Five years later, the distillery released the first bottles of Maker’s Mark Bourbon Whisky, which featured the distillery’s distinctive red wax seal. The distillery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 and was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1980. Made from a mash of corn, wheat, and malted barley, Maker’s bourbon is aged in limestone cellars and handcrafted in small batches. They are one of the few distilleries that rotate their barrels from the upper to the lower levels of the aging warehouses during the aging process. This ensures that the barrels get equal treatment, evening out the differences in temperature fluctuation that occurs during the maturation process. This is the first new Makers Mark recipe in at least five decades. Maker’s 46 is Maker’s Mark with a French Twist. A full-fledged Maker’s Mark, aged for an extended period in seared French oak staves. The staves were sourced from the Independent Stave Company, who experimented with 10 virgin French oak staves, testing several different levels of sear to caramelize the wood sugars and seal in the bitter tannins of the oak. The final staves, labeled “Profile 46,” were then added to the barrels of original Maker’s Mark, and aged in Maker’s limestone bourbon cellars. The French oak staves create a smoother, bolder, more complex flavor profile, imparting more spice, sweetness, and vanilla onto the spirit. Bottled in a hand-dipped square-shaped vial at a solid 47% ABV.

$65 Maker’s Mark Cask Strength Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

On October 1, 1953, William Samuels Sr. purchased Burks Distillery, which was situated in Loretto, Kentucky, for $35,000. Five years later, the distillery released the first bottles of Maker’s Mark Bourbon Whisky, which featured the distillery’s distinctive red wax seal. The distillery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, and was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1980. Under the auspices of Robert Samuels (William’s son), Maker’s Mark Distillery announced the release of a cask strength bourbon in 2014. Made from a mash of corn, wheat and malted barley, the bourbon was aged for approximately six years before being bottled at cask strength. Uncut and unfiltered, the bourbon has an aroma of caramel, Indian cooking spices and roasted corn that give way to notes of caramel apples, brown sugar and bananas on the palate. The finish has hints of citrus, orange zest and apple cider. Aroma of caramel, Indian cooking spices and roasted corn that give way to notes of caramel apples, brown sugar and bananas on the palate. Finish has hints of citrus, orange zest and apple cider.

$130 Old Bones 10 Year Reserve Straight Bourbon Whiskey

BOTTLER: Backbone Bourbon Co. Referred to by some as the “backbone” of the United States, the Midwest often conjures images of highly-skilled, industrious people whose hard work in fields and factories contributes immensely to the prosperity of our nation. For many such Americans, a glass of bourbon has long been the reward for a tough day spent working in those fields and factories, and Backbone Bourbon Company was established to create big, bold flavors deserving of our attention at the end of a long day. Old Bones Straight Bourbon Whiskey is a 10-year-old, limited-edition bourbon with a uniquely high-rye mashbill (55% corn, 40% rye and 5% barley). The whiskey itself was distilled at MGP in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and is bottled at barrel strength — a punchy 110 proof. Aromas of cherry wood, cloves and apple pie lead to flavors of butter, pralines, coffee and key lime on the palate. A bold finish is accented by tobacco and sweet cream. Only 405 cases of this limited-edition bourbon were produced

$29 Old Ezra 7 Year Old Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Notes of caramel and vanilla on the nose, with a great amount of oak and charcoal followed by fruits and nutty flavors ending with a slight burn on the back palate. The finish is long with nuanced notes and oaky flavors.

$60 Old Forester Statesman Straight Bourbon Whiskey

During the late 19th century, an overwhelming number of distilleries throughout the United States were still not aging their whiskey. As a result, some retailers would add juices and syrups to sweeten the whiskey, while others would add acid and tobacco to give their whiskey its signature, amber hue. In 1870, George Garvin Brown — a young pharmaceuticals salesman from Kentucky — saw the need for a consistently high-quality whiskey that would remain unadulterated after distillation. After saving $5,500, Brown and his brother opened the doors to J.T.S. Brown & Bro. Distillery and began distilling bourbon. Unlike other distilleries at the time, Brown aged his bourbon, which was named Old Forester, in oak casks and bottled it in a sealed glass bottle to ensure authenticity and quality. Since its introduction in 1870, Old Forester has been on the market continuously, even during Prohibition, when it continued to be sold for medicinal purposes. It is the only bourbon continuously distilled and marketed by the founding family before, during and after Prohibition. Old Forester Classic Kentucky Straight Bourbon touts itself as the first bourbon ever bottled. The bourbon is made from a mash of corn, rye and malted barley — after the grains have been milled and mashed, they are fermented for five to seven days with a proprietary yeast strain that is grown fresh daily at the distillery. This extra-long fermentation process ensures that the bourbon has an unparalleled depth and complexity. Following fermentation, the grains are twice distilled before being matured in new, American oak casks. Inspired by the film the “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” this expression is bold and blended to 95 proof from hand-selected casks of Old Forester’s renowned Kentucky Straight bourbon “from the warmest places in the warehouse. Because true character is only revealed after a little heat” (producer). In a statement, President of Old Forester Campbell Brown proclaimed “…We’ve created an Old Forester Statesman product that is very different from the Old Forester that you would be buying today. It's in an older sort of bottle, it's a premium expression of what we make.” Winner of a Masters at the American Whiskey Masters Competition, the Statesman is an exceptional balance of heat and spice.

$55 Old Forester 1870 Original Batch Bourbon Whiskey

During the late 19th century, an overwhelming number of distilleries throughout the United States were still not aging their whiskey. As a result, some retailers would add juices and syrups to sweeten the whiskey, while others would add acid and tobacco to give their whiskey its signature, amber hue. In 1870, George Garvin Brown — a young pharmaceuticals salesman from Kentucky — saw the need for a consistently high-quality whiskey that would remain unadulterated after distillation. After saving $5,500, Brown and his brother opened the doors to J.T.S. Brown & Bro. Distillery and began distilling bourbon. Unlike other distilleries at the time, Brown aged his bourbon, which was named Old Forester, in oak casks and bottled it in a sealed glass bottle to ensure authenticity and quality. Since its introduction in 1870, Old Forester has been on the market continuously, even during Prohibition, when it continued to be sold for medicinal purposes. It is the only bourbon continuously distilled and marketed by the founding family before, during and after Prohibition. Old Forester 1870 Original Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is the first release in Old Forester’s Whiskey Row Series, which aims to “highlight the distillery’s significant milestones and production innovations” throughout its nearly 150 year history. The whiskey is named for another practice pioneered by George Garvin Brown — batch distillation. Brown was the first to batch together bourbons from multiple distilleries in order to ensure consistency of flavor. In homage to Brown’s pioneering spirit, Old Forester 1870 Original Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made by batching together bourbons from various warehouses at the distillery, creating a final product that is greater than the sum of its parts. Old Forester 1870 Original Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey has a lively aroma of caramel apple, vanilla bean and oak, which leads to a palate filled with leather, tobacco and vibrant spices including cinnamon and ginger. The finish is dry and smooth, with notes of oak, candybar and more baking spices.

$28 Old Forester Classic Kentucky Straight Bourbon

During the late 19th century, an overwhelming number of distilleries throughout the United States were still not aging their whiskey. As a result, some retailers would add juices and syrups to sweeten the whiskey, while others would add acid and tobacco to give their whiskey its signature, amber hue. In 1870, George Garvin Brown — a young pharmaceuticals salesman from Kentucky — saw the need for a consistently high-quality whiskey that would remain unadulterated after distillation. After saving $5,500, Brown and his brother opened the doors to J.T.S. Brown & Bro. Distillery and began distilling bourbon. Unlike other distilleries at the time, Brown aged his bourbon, which was named Old Forester, in oak casks and bottled it in a sealed glass bottle to ensure authenticity and quality. Since its introduction in 1870, Old Forester has been on the market continuously, even during Prohibition, when it continued to be sold for medicinal purposes. It is the only bourbon continuously distilled and marketed by the founding family before, during and after Prohibition. Old Forester Classic Kentucky Straight Bourbon touts itself as the first bourbon ever bottled. The bourbon is made from a mash of corn, rye and malted barley — after the grains have been milled and mashed, they are fermented for five to seven days with a proprietary yeast strain that is grown fresh daily at the distillery. This extra-long fermentation process ensures that the bourbon has an unparalleled depth and complexity. Following fermentation, the grains are twice distilled before being matured in new, American oak casks. Old Forester Classic Kentucky Straight Bourbon has a sharp, sweet aroma filled with vanilla, tobacco, mint and an underlying oak character. The palate is a bit spicier, with initial caramel notes leading to flavors of toast and breakfast cereal. Sharp, sweet aroma filled with vanilla, tobacco, mint and an underlying oak character. The palate is a bit spicier, with initial caramel notes leading to flavors of toast and breakfast cereal. Finish is long and dry, with more oak and some light citrus flavors, including orange peel, bitter apple and pear.

Old Forester 1920 Prohibition Style Bourbon Whiskey

During the late 19th century, an overwhelming number of distilleries throughout the United States were still not aging their whiskey. As a result, some retailers would add juices and syrups to sweeten the whiskey, while others would add acid and tobacco to give their whiskey its signature, amber hue. In 1870, George Garvin Brown — a young pharmaceuticals salesman from Kentucky — saw the need for a consistently high-quality whiskey that would remain unadulterated after distillation. After saving $5,500, Brown and his brother opened the doors to J.T.S. Brown & Bro. Distillery and began distilling bourbon. Unlike other distilleries at the time, Brown aged his bourbon, which was named Old Forester, in oak casks and bottled it in a sealed glass bottle to ensure authenticity and quality. Since its introduction in 1870, Old Forester has been on the market continuously, even during Prohibition, when it continued to be sold for medicinal purposes. It is the only bourbon continuously distilled and marketed by the founding family before, during and after Prohibition. Old Forester 1920 Prohibition Style Bourbon is the third release in the Old Forester Whiskey Row series. A 115 proof expression that “celebrates the brand’s continued distillation during Prohibition. For 13 years, the production, transport and sale of alcohol was strictly prohibited. However, Old Forester was granted a permit to continue distilling on Louisville’s Whiskey Row. The 115 proof expression represents a barrel sample that company president Owsley Brown I would have batched at the beginning of Prohibition.” On the nose this 1920 Prohibition Style Bourbon is an intense medley of cherry preserves, drippy caramel, dark chocolate, thickened maple syrup and seasoned oak spiciness. On the palate are notes of dark caramel, layers of malt nuttiness and sweet graham cracker, all warmed by green peppercorn and coriander spice, brightened with a hint of cedar. For the finish a tart apple crispness gives way to a long smoky finish full of toasted marshmallow, chocolate and graham cracker sweetness.

$55 Old Forester 1897 Bottled in Bond Bourbon Whiskey

During the late 19th century, an overwhelming number of distilleries throughout the United States were still not aging their whiskey. As a result, some retailers would add juices and syrups to sweeten the whiskey, while others would add acid and tobacco to give their whiskey its signature, amber hue. In 1870, George Garvin Brown — a young pharmaceuticals salesman from Kentucky — saw the need for a consistently high-quality whiskey that would remain unadulterated after distillation. After saving $5,500, Brown and his brother opened the doors to J.T.S. Brown & Bro. Distillery and began distilling bourbon. Unlike other distilleries at the time, Brown aged his bourbon, which was named Old Forester, in oak casks and bottled it in a sealed glass bottle to ensure authenticity and quality. Since its introduction in 1870, Old Forester has been on the market continuously, even during Prohibition, when it continued to be sold for medicinal purposes. It is the only bourbon continuously distilled and marketed by the founding family before, during and after Prohibition. Old Forester 1897 Bottled in Bond Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is the second release in Old Forester’s Whiskey Row Series, which aims to “highlight the distillery’s significant milestones and production innovations” throughout its nearly 150 year history. The whiskey pays homage to the Bottled-In-Bond Act of 1897 (27 C.F.R. 5.21), which stipulates that any spirit labeled as "bonded"or "bottled-in-bond" must be the product of one distiller at one distillery during one distillation season. In addition, the Act requires that bonded spirits be aged in a federally bonded warehouse under U.S. government supervision for at least four years and bottled at 100 proof. Old Forester’s “sealed-in-quality” concept preempted the Bottled-In-Bond Act of 1897, and Old Forester 1897 Bottled in Bond Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is made according to the distillery’s exacting standards which date back to the 19th century. As a result, the whiskey has a robust aroma of caramel, coffee beans and starfruit, which leads to a deep palate filled with oak, vanilla and gingerbread. The finish is slightly hot and full of flavor, including notes of sugar cereal, burnt toast and cloves.

Redemption 9 Year Old Barrel Proof Bourbon

As the quintessential American whiskey, federal regulations in the United States (27 C.F.R. 5 to be specific) require that bourbon be made from a mashbill of at least 51% corn before being aged in new oak barrels and bottled at 80 proof or higher. Bourbon that meets these requirements and that has been aged for a minimum of at least two years may be called straight bourbon. Prior to Prohibition, rye whiskey was the staple ingredient of classic cocktails such as the Old Fashioned, the Manhattan and the Whiskey Sour. Spicier and more robust than malt whiskey, rye was so popular that George Washington distilled it at his estate in Mount Vernon. As distilleries across the country were forced to close their doors due to Prohibition, however, bootleggers began distilling gin instead of rye, and for good reason — gin didn't require aging under the watchful eye of a master distiller and its true flavors could be hidden behind a mask of botanicals. As Americans grew accustomed to gin, rye whiskey became an anachronism. Redemption Barrel Bourbon Whiskey is made from a mash of 75% corn, 21% rye, and 4% barley, which makes it significantly lower than their high-rye bourbon but still on par with other classic high-ryes like Four Roses and Wild Turkey, which clock in between eight and sixteen percent rye mash. A bit more approachable to dedicated cask-strength bourbon drinkers, this bottle of Redemption is a good balance between America's historical staple (rye), and its current love (bourbon). After distillation, it is aged for nine years in new, charred American oak casks before being hand bottled. The nose features prominent oak notes mellowed with caramel, mineral water, anise, orange rind and cocoa. The palate continues to be carried by caramel flavors, with spice and dark fruits leading to a medium finish of herbs and spices. The bourbon has notes of sweet caramel, dried fruits and toffee, which complement hints of cinnamon and spicy rye.

$55 Smooth Ambler Contradiction

Embedded in the rolling Appalachian hills of Greenbrier County, West Virginia, Smooth Ambler Spirits is a testament to the hard-work and craftsmanship of TAG Galyean and John Little. Working in their state-of-the-art, 5,200 square foot distillery, Galyean and Little combine innovative techniques with locally-sourced grains and a hands-on distillation process to produce remarkable spirits that are bold, complex and perfectly balanced. Smooth Ambler Contradiction Bourbon combines two- to three-year-old stock of the distillery’s Smooth Ambler Yearling Bourbon (27%), dubbed a “wheater” for the high amount of wheat contained in its mashbill, with a nine-year-old, high-rye bourbon sourced from the old Seagram’s facility in Indiana (73%). The “contradiction” is a nod to Smooth Ambler Spirits’ efforts to create its own amazing whiskey while simultaneously sourcing and bringing to market the best whiskey made by others. Smooth Ambler Contradiction Bourbon has an aroma of orchard fruits, maraschino cherries and mint, which leads to a robust palate filled with toffee, caramel, burnt sugar and nutmeg. The exquisite finish is marked by hints of sweet grass, buttered rye bread and mild spice. The whiskey earned a Gold Medal at Whiskey Magazine's 2016 World Whiskies Awards.

$45 Virginia Black American Whiskey

Brent Hocking, former mortgage banker, and current CEO of Virginia Black American whiskey, is an award-winning spirits producer best known for creating the original DeLeòn Tequila. Receiver of the Robb Report Spirit of the Year award winner three years in a row, and a back-to-back Grand Champion at the World Beverage Competition in Geneva, Switzerland, Hocking has a very reputable nose for liquor. Born a preacher’s son in Compton California, Hocking is establishing a rep in the Hip Hop business, neither of which are strangers to spirits industry. But the southern Cali mogul is cultivating new ties between the two with his eccentric "luxury with an edge" branding approach. He launched two beverages associated with Hip-Hop Cash Kings, a signature series from Forbes magazine featuring “10 Years of Hip Hop Kings.” After founding award winning DeLeón tequila in 2009 it was sold to industry giant Diageo and rapper Diddy in 2013. Hocking’s newest venture is Virginia Black whiskey, which is actually a first step into the Spirits world for his fellow collaborator, award-winning artist Drake, who is quite devoted and personally invested into the brand. Released in 2016 Virginia Black is bottled and distilled at MGPI in Lawrenceburg, IN. The Whiskey is a blend of hand selected 2, 3, and four year old bourbons, rich in rye. Bottled at a much lower 40% ABV, it's a smoother, sweeter bourbon whiskey, an intentional effort to attract those who aren’t traditionally bourbon drinkers. It is bottled in a luxurious art-deco inspired glass, with elegant gold detail.

$45 Woodford Reserve Kentucky Straight Bourbon Distiller’s Select

Nestled amid the rolling hills of bluegrass and thoroughbred farms sits one of Kentucky’s oldest and smallest distilleries. The iconic Woodford Reserve Distillery sits on the grounds of a National historic landmark. It is Kentucky’s oldest distilling site where the legendary Elijah Pepper began crafting whiskey in 1812, beginning a dynastic legacy in Kentucky Bourbon. It was on this same sacred soil that years later, Master Distiller James Christopher Crow developed his whiskey-making methods, alongside Oscar Pepper, “which today have become common practice, including the implementation of sour mash into fermentation.” Revolutionizing concepts of sour mash and yeast propagation, and modernizing the process of whiskey production in the US. Produced under the Brown-Forman Corporation, Woodford Reserve Bourbons are premium spirits crafted in small batches and aged in new char oak barrels. This artisanal process allows them to “craft using all five sources of bourbon flavor, giving it its distinct taste and crisp, clean finish.” Woodford Reserve’s Distillery houses an impressive 500-foot-long gravity-fed barrel run, along with their iconic copper pot stills, and 100-year-old cypress wood fermenters. Their facility also has one of the only heat cycled barrelhouses in the world. An impressive mechanism which gives Woodford Reserve its color and signature flavor. As the official bourbon of the Kentucky Derby, Woodford Reserve Distiller’s Select is “comprised of more than 200 detectable flavor notes, from bold grain and wood, to sweet aromatics, spice, and fruit & floral notes.” The smooth and decadent flagship bottling has been winning awards since 1999, with an exhaustive list of accolades that includes a winning streak of Gold and Double Gold Medals at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition four consecutive years (2011-2014).

$50 Wyoming Whiskey Small Batch Bourbon

In the small town of Kirby, Wyoming — population 92 — Brad Mead, a fifth-generation rancher whose family first came to Wyoming in 1890, is continuing a tradition of “firsts.” While his family has produced U.S. senators, lawyers, extreme skiers and two governors of Wyoming, Brad, along with his wife Kathy and their son Sam, established the first legal distillery in Wyoming State in 2009, and has been making exceptional, handmade whisky ever since. Mead developed the recipe for his Wyoming Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey with the help of Bourbon Hall of Fame member Steve Nally, who previously spent over 30 years at Maker’s Mark, and Lincoln Henderson, the founder of Angel’s Envy. The mash bill itself reflects the rustic and beautiful terroir of Wyoming State — all of the grains (corn, wheat and barley) are grown within 100 miles of the cutting-edge distillery. Once distilled through both a column and pot still, Wyoming Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey is aged for at least five years in charred, white oak barrels stored at one of three warehouses in Kirby. During the summer, temperatures can reach sustained levels of 130+ degrees, whereas the winter frequently brings sub-zero temperatures. This extreme fluctuation results in a whisky that is more dynamic in less time aging. Bottled at 44% ABV (Wyoming was the 44th state to join the Union), Wyoming Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey has an aroma of Nutella, cinnamon and oak, which leads to spicy flavors of black pepper, barrel char and orange peel on the palate. The finish is subtle and incredibly smooth.

Yellowstone Select Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Yellowstone National Park was established in 1876, and just a few short years later, the Yellowstone Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey brand would emerge with an equally-rich story. J.B. Dant, legendary distiller and son of J.W. Dant, first began distilling in the late 1800s, using a “log still” instead of the more popular — yet more expensive — copper pot stills (a log still is made by hollowing out a tree trunk and lining the interior with copper pipes, a cheaper yet still effective way of distilling). As Dant’s Yellowstone brand gained popularity in Kentucky, he was able to purchase other nearby distilleries and formalize his process. In the early 1900s, it was through this expansion that Dant began working more closely with M.C. Beam of the illustrious Beam family. Together, Dant and Beam operated their network of facilities as the Yellowstone Distillery, and continued to produce Yellowstone Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey for “medicinal purposes” throughout Prohibition. Although the Yellowstone brand changed hands several times throughout the 20th century (first to Diageo and recently to Luxco) and eventually fell out of favor, Luxco, along with the Beam family’s new Limestone Branch Distillery, has recently revitalized the brand, unearthing an old Beam family recipe and partnering with Paul and Steve Beam to create a spectacular bourbon that pays homage to the original. Yellowstone Select Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey has been hand-picked by Paul and Steve Beam, and is a marriage of two high-rye Kentucky straight bourbon whiskies, one aged four years and another aged seven years. According to the Beam brothers, the idea was to create a “well-rounded bourbon – a spicy rye taste at first rounding out with caramel notes and a rich, brown sugar finish that highlights Kentucky tradition.” Indeed, the bourbon has spicy aromas of rye toast and cinnamon spice, which lead to a palate filled with caramel, melted butter and leathered cherries. The finish is slightly tangy, with additional notes of burnt brown sugar and cloves.